Talks

All talks take place Saturday and Sunday at the Emily Carr University of Art + Design

Saturday

The greatest stories ever told . . . so far

HOTAM

  • Saturday, October 19, 11:00 AM
  • Rennie Room

This talk is a brief overview of various publishing projects that Ho Tam has been involved in, from the artist’s book The Yellow Pages made in 1993, to his latest work The Greatest Stories Ever Told. From publishing his own work, the artist has moved into collaboration with, and distribution of, work by others. Tam has worked with many artists nationally and internationally, and has edited an anthology of eighteen Canadian photographers published in Beijing, China.

The Greatest Stories Ever Told now has fourteen language versions, and the collection is still growing. Recently, Tam started another project, a bookshop/gallery, in hopes of building a space for the artists’ book community in Vancouver.

Vancouver-based artist Ho Tam, who was born in Hong Kong and grew up in Toronto, works in a wide range of mediums including painting, drawing, photography, video and prints. In recent years, he has travelled to and exhibited in many art book fairs, including London, New York, Paris, Tokyo, Seoul and Shanghai.

B&D Press

Eloisa Aquino and Jenny Lin

  • Saturday, October 20, 12:00 PM
  • Rennie Room

The founders of B&D Press, Eloisa Aquino and Jenny Lin, will talk about the history of the press, their art practice within and outside of the press and experimental publishing as praxis.

B&D Press is a micropress and art project by Eloisa Aquino and Jenny Lin. Operating from Montreal since 2009, the press publishes non-fiction and auto-fiction zines and artists’ books, often dealing with queer themes.

NISHGA: An Artist Talk

Jordan Abel

  • Saturday, October 19, 1:00 PM
  • Rennie Room

NISHGA is a deeply personal and autobiographical book that attempts to address the complications of contemporary Indigenous existence. As a Nisga’a writer, Jordan Abel often finds himself in a position where he is asked to explain his relationship to Nisga’a language, community and cultural knowledge. However, as an intergenerational survivor of residential school—both of his grandparents attended the same residential school in Chilliwack, British Columbia—his relationship to his own Indigenous identity is complicated to say the least. NISHGA explores those complications and is invested in understanding how colonial violence originating at the Coqualeetza Indian Residential School impacted his grandparents’ generation, his father’s generation and ultimately his own. The project is rooted in a desire to illuminate the realities of intergenerational survivors of residential school, but sheds light on Indigenous experiences that may not seem to be immediately (or inherently) Indigenous. Drawing on autobiography, a series of interconnected documents (including pieces of memoir, transcriptions of talks and photography), NISHGA is a book about confronting difficult truths and about how both Indigenous and non-Indigenous peoples engage with a history of colonial violence that is quite often rendered invisible.

Jordan Abel is a Nisga’a writer from Vancouver. He is the author of The Place of Scraps (winner of the Dorothy Livesay Poetry Prize), Un/inhabited and Injun (winner of the Griffin Poetry Prize). Abel recently completed a PhD at Simon Fraser University, and is currently working as an Assistant Professor at the University of Alberta where he teaches Indigenous Literatures and Creative Writing.

Keynote: The Baudelaire Fractal

Lisa Robertson

  • Saturday, October 19, 2:00 PM
  • Reliance Theatre

I will narrate a peculiar and, for me, unprecedented experience. One morning some 2 or 3 years ago, I woke up in a hotel with the sound, irrefutable inner knowledge that it was I who had written the complete works of Baudelaire, the French poet who lived between 1821 and 1867, and whose 1857 book Les Fleurs du mal was condemned for obscenity. I hasten to explain that I have not been a lifelong reader of Baudelaire. I have received his work belatedly, reading Benjamin, like most of my contemporaries in the arts, reading Mallarme, as do my poetry colleagues, translating Emile Benveniste’s Baudelairean notes, recently discovered in the linguist’s archive or simply by looking at the photographic portraits by his good friend Nadar, admiring the cut of his jackets. There was a flurry of research in the autumn of last year, when I discovered in his prose writings the incendiary figure of the menopausal she-dandy. Then, I unexpectedly received the entire authorship of all of his work: the Salons, the letters, the prose poems, the itinerant criticism and the poems, even the translations. It was not that I became Baudelaire; I remained myself, admittedly with some disappointment. Excerpted from the novel of the same title, which will appear in January 2020, this lecture is a partial account of that strange transmission.

Lisa Robertson is a poet and essayist. She began writing in Vancouver in the early 1990s, collaborating with a community of artists and poets that included Artspeak Gallery, New Star Books, The Western Front and The Kootenay School of Writing. She has continued these activities for thirty years, publishing books, chapbooks, leaflets and posters, translating poetry and linguistics from French and lecturing and teaching internationally (including at Cambridge University, Simon Fraser, Princeton, Piet Zwart Institute, UC Berkeley and Jack Kerouac School of Disembodied Poetics). The 2017 recipient of an Honorary Doctorate of Letters from Emily Carr University of Art + Design, the Foundation for the Contemporary Arts in New York awarded her the 2018 CD Wright Award in Poetry. Books include Nilling: Prose Essays (2011), 3 Summers (2016), Cinema of the Present (2014) and The Weather (2001). She lives in France.

Sponsored by the Libby Leshgold Gallery

Keynote Reception

Lisa Robertson

  • Saturday, October 19, 3:00 PM
  • READ Books

Join Lisa Robertson, Kathy Slade and READ Books for a reception in the bookstore adjacent the Libby Leshgold Gallery

NWC Talks

Dana Claxton

  • Saturday, October 19, 4:00 PM
  • Rennie Room

A round table conversation between NWC editor Dana Claxton and NWC artists and writers Marika Swan, Roxanne Charles, Brenda Crabtree and Morgan Asoyuf on the sociopolitical context for their contemporary art practices and engagement with traditional Indigenous Northwest Coast visual culture.

NWC is a five-part publication series edited by Dana Claxton and produced by Or Gallery.

From documents to exhibitions and back again: a look at Artexte’s research residency program

Joana Joachim

  • Saturday, October 19, 5:00 PM
  • Rennie Room

Since the early 2000s, Artexte’s research residency program has invited researchers, artists and curators to explore their collection and develop knowledge on a particular subject or inspire new ideas for artistic creation. Residency projects are selected for their pertinence to the interests and research needs of the local and international artistic community. The Artexte residency program highlights the collection holdings, fosters the production of new publications and enables residents to circulate their work in Artexte’s artistic networks and to the local public in Montreal. Joachim will trace this ongoing cycle by connecting the physical and digital collections with residency projects and their resulting publications, artworks and exhibition.

Joana Joachim is the Research and Exhibitions Coordinator at Artexte and a PhD Candidate in the Department of Art History and at the Institute for Gender, Sexuality and Feminist Studies at McGill University in Montréal, Québec. Her research interests include Black feminist studies, Black Canadian studies and Canadian slavery studies.

Sunday

Third Rail in Conversation

Third Rail Quarterly

  • Sunday, October 20, 11:00 AM
  • Rennie Room

Issue 13 contributors Godfre Leung and Eldritch Priest will discuss writing about listening. Introduced by Third Rail Publisher Cameron Keith Gainer.

Godfre Leung is a critic and curator working in the territory currently known as Vancouver. His writing has appeared in numerous magazines, including Art in AmericaC MagazineThe Third Railand Yishu: Journal of Contemporary Chinese Art, and has been commissioned for publications by Artspeak Gallery, the Museum of Modern Art, Rochester Art Center, and Walker Art Center, among others. His curatorial work includes projects by Barbara Held and Benton C Bainbridge, Michael Masura Flora, Tiffany Ng, Samson Young, and the Walker Art Center exhibition International Pop, which traveled to the Dallas Art Museum and Philadelphia Museum of Art. He has received grants from the Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts and the Jerome Foundation for his art writing practice, and from the Canada Council for the Arts for several forthcoming curatorial projects.

Eldritch Priest writes on sonic culture, experimental aesthetics and the philosophy of experience from a ’pataphysical perspective. He is Assistant professor in the School for the Contemporary Arts at Simon Fraser University. Eldritch is also a composer and improviser, as well as a member the experimental theory group “The Occulture.”

Cameron Keith Gainer is a publisher, the director of a project space, and a visual artist. His publication The Third Rail, is devoted to modern and contemporary art, politics, philosophy, and culture. His project space co. (company projects) features multidisciplinary exhibitions and artist’ books. Gainer works in a diverse range of media, with solo exhibitions at Weinstein Gallery in Minneapolis, the Fabric Workshop and Museum in Philadelphia, and the Museum of Contemporary Art at USF. Group exhibitions include Koenig and Clinton Gallery, New York; David B. Smith Gallery, Denver; Minneapolis Institute of Art and Walker Art Center, Minneapolis; and McClain Gallery, Houston. Recent awards include a Smithsonian Artist Research Fellowship, Pollock-Krasner grant, James L. McKnight Visual Arts Fellowship, and Jerome Foundation support for research.

Trapp Rocks, a Coat Hanger and Some Dinners

Patrik Andersson / Trapp Projects

  • Sunday, October 19, 12:00 PM
  • Rennie Room

The talk will provide a brief overview of Trapp Projects, with a special focus on publications and editions produced over the past two decades.

Patrik Andersson teaches art history and theory at Emily Carr University of Art + Design and has since 1997 operated Trapp Projects, an independent curatorial platform on which to introduce local and international artists to as wide an audience as possible while not being limited by the mandates of traditional exhibition spaces.

Failure as Practice

GenderFail

  • Sunday, October 20, 1:00 PM
  • Rennie Room

GenderFail presents a talk that will explore publishing as a queer and intersectional artistic practice, as well as explore the creative potential of failure as a boundless form of inspiration. For GenderFail, to fail in a system that otherwise brings violence, destruction and erasure due to their otherness is a process that can be redirected toward positive ends. GenderFail will present past projects, publications and programs that inform their intersectional queer publishing as it intersects with failure.

GenderFail is a publishing and programming initiative that seeks to encourage projects that foster intersectional queer subjectivity. Projects look at various forms of failure as a boundless form of creative potential. GenderFail has been part of exhibitions, programs and events at MoMA PS1, The Studio Museum in Harlem, Williams College Museum of Art, The International Center of Photography, Wendy’s Subway, Sediment Arts, Vox Populi, EFA Project Space, Contemporary Artists’ Books Conference, Washington Center for the Arts, Ulises Books, Anderson Gallery, and After School Special.

The Media Gallery

Details in the Projects section

  • Sunday, October 20, 1:30-3:00 PM // What Can You Say About A Book and 3:30-5:00 PM // Together Apart
  • RBC Media Room

The Media Gallery is activated as space to explore the intersection of publication and presentation from a digital perspective. The 2019 projects include a selection of audio zines and a video installation curated by the Foreshore; a set of readings delivered by Skype, curated by Jaclyn Bruneau; and, a sound performance curated by Whess Harmon.

Image Caption: Erika DeFreitas, She may be moved and they multiplied most in exaggeration. (detail No. 20), 2019. Image courtesy of the artist. Stay tuned for Erika DeFreitas’ forthcoming artist project in C Magazine‘s Winter 2020 issue.

The Beginning The Middle and The End. Again.

Judy Radul

  • Sunday, October 20, 3:00 PM
  • Rennie Room

The play of recto and verso enabled by objects such as book pages that can be turned creates an ambivalent threshold zone between the imaginary of the image and the real of the reader/observer. The medial conditions for the birth of a hallucination have been met—a hallucination that is at its very core a medial operation.

— Bernhard Siegert, Cultural Techniques. Grids, Filters, Doors and Other     Articulations of the Real, 2015

This is a talk that concentrates on Judy Radul’s recent artworks involving books and magazines. Several have involved custom magazine publications whose pages are turned by a computer-controlled “page turning machine” with a video camera “reading” them. Her 2017 exhibition at Witte de With in Rotterdam made a chain of meaning between the turning pages of a magazine, opening and closing doors and windows and the shot counter shot of the video image. The attempt was to create a space which opened, closed and turned like a book.

Judy Radul’s latest works involve an original computer-controlled system for live and pre-recorded video. Recent exhibitions include: Albertinum Museum, Dresden (2019) ; Witte de With Centre for Contemporary Art, Rotterdam (2017); Contour Biennale 8, Mechelen, Belgium (2017); Berlin Biennale 8 (2014). Her newest book This Is Television (2018) was published by Sternberg Press, Berlin in 2019.

Primary Information

James Hoff

  • Sunday, October 20, 4:00 PM
  • Rennie Room

Hoff will discuss Primary Information and its publishing activities within the larger cultural framework of book production and publishing. He’ll discuss why he thinks artists’ books are still relevant in relation to, and despite our reliance on, digital platforms and networks. His talk will centre on the publication of facsimile editions of out-of-print magazines and books for which Primary Information has become known, and the social and cultural networks from which they came.

 

James Hoff is an artist and the co-founder of Primary Information, a non-profit organization devoted to publishing artists’ books. Since 2006, he and Primary Information have published over one hundred publications, including facsimiles of well known, yet out-of-print artists’ magazines and publications, such as Avalanche, YEAH, REALLIFE, Destroy All Monsters Magazine, Women’s Work, and Just Another Asshole.

Agony Klub

Casey Wei

  • Sunday, October 20, 5:00 PM
  • Rennie Room

Agony Klub (AK) is a Vancouver-based printed matter and music label that produces and releases works under the framework of the popularesoteric. Agony Club is an underground casino in the last Philip Marlowe detective novel by Raymond Chandler, Playback, which he began in 1958. Unfinished at the time of his death, it was completed by Robert B. Parker in 1988. The ‘K’ in Agony Klub is a reference to Rainer Werner Fassbinder, whose films frequently feature some kind of unheimlich performance, embodying the popularesoteric. A.K. is also the name of a documentary on Akira Kurosawa made by Chris Marker in 1985.

AK presents what the framework of the popularesoteric is, where it comes from and how it functions in an art practice, in collaboration, in the community and in our contemporary post-digital moment.

Agony Klub is artist-musician KC Wei’s music and printed matter label that produces and releases works under the framework of the popularesoteric. The label has been active since 2016, and has released twenty works thus far.

 

Projects

Additional project programming taking place in various locations throughout the Emily Carr University Exhibition Commons.

COLORAMA

Johanna Maierski

  • October 19–20, 11:00-7:00 PM
  • Exhibition Commons

CLUBHOUSE is an ongoing collaboration project that started in 2016 at COLORAMA, a publishing house and risograph printing studio based in Berlin. CLUBHOUSE began as a monthly event hosted by Aisha Franz and Johanna Maierski, where a small, changing group of artists would come together to work on a small edition of collaborative folded zines.

“Clubhouse Week“ is an extended version of the project, with the goal of finishing an entire book within a week. This June, twelve artists mainly working in comics and illustration, were invited to join an intensive workshop in Berlin to collaborate on the book together with another twelve contributing artists from afar.

THE BOOK consists of both posters and comics. The special thing about the process of working together in one space is that something like a book comes together much more naturally and cooperatively, as it pushes each participant into exploring new possibilities within their own work.

Johanna Maierski is a publisher and printer that grew up in Berlin, where she studied Architecture and Urban Research. Since 2015, she has run COLORAMA, a publishing house and riso-printing studio.

COLORAMA is dedicated to the collaboration, the observation and the production. Publications feature the works of current comic artists and ongoing research into the means of storytelling.

Since 2016 Johanna has hosted CLUBHOUSE together with Aisha Franz, a monthly collaboration project where a small group of artists creates a limited edition of folded zines in one day.

NISHGA: An Artist Project

Jordan Abel

  • October 19–20, 11:00-7:00 PM
  • Exhibition Commons

NISHGA is a deeply personal and autobiographical book that attempts to address the complications of contemporary Indigenous existence. As a Nisga’a writer, Jordan Abel often finds himself in a position where he is asked to explain his relationship to Nisga’a language, Nisga’a community, and Nisga’a cultural knowledge. However, as an intergenerational survivor of residential school–both of his grandparents attended the same residential school in Chilliwack, British Columbia–his relationship to his own Indigenous identity is complicated to say the least. NISHGA explores those complications and is invested in understanding how the colonial violence originating at the Coqualeetza Indian Residential School impacted his grandparents’ generation, then his father’s generation, and ultimately his own. The project is rooted in a desire to illuminate the realities of intergenerational survivors of residential school, but sheds light on Indigenous experiences that may not seem to be immediately (or inherently) Indigenous. Drawing on autobiography, a series of interconnected documents (including pieces of memoir, transcriptions of talks, and photography), NISHGA is a book about confronting difficult truths and it is about how both Indigenous and non-Indigenous peoples engage with a history of colonial violence that is quite often rendered invisible.

Jordan Abel is a Nisga’a writer from Vancouver. He is the author of The Place of Scraps (winner of the Dorothy Livesay Poetry Prize), Un/inhabited, and Injun (winner of the Griffin Poetry Prize). Abel recently completed a PhD at Simon Fraser University, and is currently working as an Assistant Professor at the University of Alberta where he teaches Indigenous Literatures and Creative Writing.

Bibliocache

Poor Quality

  • October 19–20, 11:00-7:00 PM
  • Exhibition Commons

Bibliocache is an experimental library of self-published projects co-curated by Aaron S Moran (Poor Quality) and Sylvana dAngelo (Zine Club).

In an attempt to move beyond the traditional bookshelf, Bibliocache encourages the audience to engage with printed materials through a playful, thoughtful and social experience. Viewers are invited to explore an installation of several architectural structures housing printed materials where they can flip through books and investigate content.

To cache is to archive, stash, collect and store. This project pulls together work from artists based in British Columbia who have produced books, but may not use the format as their primary medium. Other artists were asked to produce books for the first time as a potential extension of their practices.

Bibliocache showcases the way books are used by artists across a range of mediums, while encouraging the exploration of the book format as a way to disseminate ideas.

Made in the mountains of Chilliwack, BC. We create zines and prints from visual art, photography and text. We reject the idea of DIY as “lesser than” in terms of quality or production. We reject slick commercial projects and full colour glossy printing in favour of speed-of-production and content. As a counterpoint to mass production and consumption, we aim to continue the DIY lineage through the production of unique artistic documents. What is the most that can be done with the least?

not doing a talk

  • October 19–20, 11:00-7:00 PM
  • Exhibition Commons

The Practice of Artists’ Publishing is a studio course that examines the act of publication as a critically engaged visual art practice. Students will work collaboratively making use of ECUAD Library’s excellent artist book collection to produce an exhibition that will consider early Fluxus and Conceptual works as well as more recent and contemporary projects.

SCA Artists’ Publishing Class Research Project

SFU visual art students participating in the SCA course “The Practice of Artists’ Publishing” will present a special research project especially for the VABF

 

Zine Zone

The Zine Zone is dedicated to exhibiting experimental print projects and publication as installation. A lounge featuring sculpted works, zines on display and plush seating for reading and relaxing.

GenderFail Archive Project

GenderFail

  • October 19–20, 11:00-7:00 PM
  • Exhibition Commons

The GenderFail Archive Project is a collaborative reading room that looks at archiving as a social activity. The project started out of the desire to share a personal library of art-focused publications and to provide a platform for cherished publications. Through this project they facilitate a socially-engaged experiment on archiving fuelled by outside interpretations on a personal collection of publications. Artists, collectives and institutions are invited by GenderFail to curate a selection of publications from their  library based on each curator’s aesthetic and conceptual interests. Publications for our Reading Room at VABF have been curated by Zine Club.

Selected publications are presented on sculptural book displays made in collaboration with artists and designers. Each artist has been selected because of their work’s potential to be translated into designed objects that can help support artist-made publications. In each collaboration, artists are prompted to make a sculpture that can be used to display books from the GenderFail Archive. For the VABF Reading Room, GenderFail has worked with Detroit-based Hamtramck Ceramck on a new series of ceramic sculptural book displays.

GenderFail is a publishing and programming initiative that seeks to encourage projects that foster intersectional queer subjectivity. Projects look at various forms of failure as a boundless form of creative potential. GenderFail has been part of exhibitions, programs and events at MoMA PS1, The Studio Museum in Harlem, Williams College Museum of Art, The International Center of Photography, Wendy’s Subway, Sediment Arts, Vox Populi, EFA Project Space, Contemporary Artists’ Books Conference, Washington Center for the Arts, Ulises Books, Anderson Gallery, and After School Special.

ABW

Art Book Week is a parallel series of events hosted in spaces across Vancouver by a variety of artists, curators, collectives and institutions who are actively creating and presenting work in this medium.

 

Event listings coming soon…