Program

Talks

All talks take place Saturday and Sunday at the Emily Carr University of Art + Design

Saturday

Why Books?

Vivian Sming

  • Saturday October 20, 12:00pm
  • Artists' Book Room, Library

Artist and publisher Vivian Sming will present a lecture through a series of questions: Who makes art accessible? Are there truly interdisciplinary spaces? Where do we invest our divestments? Is cultural equity possible? Where does discourse lie? Can we create forms of institutional critique that can become gateways for creating non-institutions? Can we create and support art without relying on the accumulation of wealth or the taking of space? Can we make art that takes up as little space as possible, but emanates, reverberates, and is still felt profoundly throughout the world?

Vivian Sming is a San Francisco Bay Area–based artist and writer. Under her publishing studio Sming Sming Books, her work operates through on publications, programming, and alternative pedagogical formats.

Publishing Performance

David Senior

  • Saturday October 20, 1:00pm
  • Artists' Book Room, Library

Librarian David Senior leads a discussion on the intersection between artists’ publications and performance art, introducing a selection of archival artists’ books, magazines and ephemera that reflect the experimental ways published works were used to communicate and distribute a new artistic practice. Examples come from the collection of the SFMoMA, where Senior acts as Head of Library and Archives, and from MoMA, New York, where he worked as Senior Bibliographer.

Presented in partnership with the Vancouver Art Gallery

David Senior is the Head of Library and Archives at the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art. Previously, Senior was the Senior Bibliographer at the Museum of Modern Art Library in New York City. At MoMA, he was responsible for developing the Library’s artists’ books collection. His writing has appeared in Frieze, Dot Dot Dot, Bulletins of the Serving Library, Art Papers, and C Magazine. He serves on the advisory committees of Printed Matter and Art Resources Transfer, and on the board of directors of Primary Information and Yale Union.

An Inventory of Inventories

Shannon Harvey

  • Saturday October 20, 2:00pm
  • Artists' Book Room, Library

How to perform a book, fit a classroom in a box, and other design and publishing experiments with Shannon Harvey.

Shannon Harvey is co-founder of Los Angeles-based design studio IN-FO.CO (Inventory Form & Content) and Managing Director of Inventory Press, an independent publishing company focussed on art, architecture, design, and music, with an emphasis on the sociopolitical aspects of material culture. Harvey previously worked as a curator, editor, and designer at Project Projects, Rockwell Group, Van Alen Institute, and the Canadian Centre for Architecture.

Raising Frogs for $$$

Jason Fulford

  • Saturday October 20, 3:00pm
  • Artists' Book Room, Library

Tree rings, Kierkegaard, and a spiral binding machine. What else do you need? Come to Jason Fulford’s talk and find out.

Jason Fulford is a photographer and Co-founder of J&L Books. He is a Guggenheim Fellow, a frequent lecturer at universities, and has led workshops across the United States, Japan, Italy, Poland, The Netherlands, Slovenia, Lithuania, Germany, and Spain. His monographs include Sunbird (2000), Crushed (2003), Raising Frogs for $$$ (2006), The Mushroom Collector (2010), Hotel Oracle (2013), Contains: 3 Books (2016), Clayton’s Ascent (2018), and The Medium is a Mess (2018).

On Artist Writes

Shana Lutker

  • Saturday October 20, 4:00pm
  • Artists' Book Room, Library

Los Angeles–based artist Shana Lutker (X-TRA) will present a talk on the role of artist’s writing in contemporary art discourse from an artist’s perspective. Focus will be on X-TRA’s recent Artist Writes series, featuring commissioned pieces by A.L. Steiner, Andrea Fraser, Martine Syms, and Pope.L. Looking at these examples and sharing clips of the associated public programs, Lutker will talk about how the series came together and about artist’s writing in a historical context, followed by a discussion with audience about artist’s writing as a form.

Shana Lutker is a Los Angeles–based artist and Executive Director of Project X Foundation for Art & Criticism, the nonprofit Publisher of artist-run contemporary art journal X-TRA. Lutker’s sculpture and performance have shown widely, including the Whitney Biennial 2014, Performa 2013, and solo exhibitions at the Hirshhorn in Washington DC and Pérez Art Museum Miami.

Graphic Design v Artists Books

Fraser Muggeridge

  • Saturday October 20, 5:00pm
  • Artists' Book Room, Library

Fraser Muggeridge is the founder of Fraser Muggeridge studio, a graphic design company based in London prioritizing artists’ and writers’ content over the imposition of a signature style. Muggeridge founded and is a tutor at Typography Summer School, a week-long programme of typographic study for recent graduates and professionals, held in London (since 2010) and New York (since 2013). He is a visiting lecturer at The University of Reading and Camberwell College of Art, London.

Presented in partnership with Emily Carr University

Northwest Coast Series Launch

Dana Claxton and Skeena Reece

  • Saturday October 20, 6:00pm
  • Artists' Book Room, Library

Skeena Reece is the inaugural writer and artist featured in Or Gallery’s limited edition publication series, NWC. Series editor Dana Claxton has selected five, Northwest Coast First Nations writers and artists whose work will be featured in this series. NWC is intended to highlight the Northwest Coast region as a place in common that underlines the development and thrivance of the contemporary creative practices of five Indigenous women beginning with Reece’s text, “The Business of Native Art Criticism becomes Critical,” which is launching at VABF 2018 with this talk between Dana Claxton and Skeena Reece.

Presented in partnership with Or Gallery

Skeena Reece is a Tsimshian/Gitksan and Cree artist. Her practice includes performance art, spoken word, humor, “sacred clowning,” writing, singing, songwriting, video and visual art. Dana Claxton is an artist and filmmaker. She is an Associate Professor in the Department of Visual Art, Art History and Theory at UBC and her family reserve is Wood Mountain Lakota First Nations.

Sunday

A Curatorial Approach to Publishing

Decoy Magazine

  • Sunday October 21, 12:00pm
  • Artists' Book Room, Library

Lauren Marsden and Whitney Brennan from Decoy Magazine discuss the productive possibilities of co-opting the magazine format for curatorial impulses, shaking off categorical expectations in the field of art publishing, and the value of slowness in developing independence as a project-based publication. They will discuss the history of Decoy, building non-commercial longevity online, and entry points for emerging writers, artists and readers.

Founded in 2012, Decoy Magazine is a publication project based in Vancouver, BC that engages artists and writers, both locally and abroad. With an emphasis on social and political contexts and the use of publishing as a curatorial platform, our mission is to foster a thoughtful dialogue among arts and culture through the production of artist portfolios, essays, interviews, and digital exhibitions. The name Decoy is inspired by our desire to bring attention to alternative and unexpected frameworks for the distribution and critical engagement of contemporary art practices.

Arts Assembly

Meichen Waxer

  • Sunday October 21, 11:30am
  • Zine Zone, Exhibition Commons

Meichen Waxer, Director and Co-Founder of Arts Assembly, will be giving a talk on her two year collaborative project with halka sanat projesi. Oscillating between the pragmatic framework this exchange exists within and a lucid narrative in an attempt to capture the intersecting research and works by Lara Ögel, Merve Unsal, Sasha J. Langford and Damla Tamer. The first year of this exchange which concluded in August 2018 was centered around the question of “How do you hold space”.

Arts Assembly was founded in 2016, and has since been run and visioned by self identified womxn. A not-for-profit, community-centric, arts organization, Arts Assembly emphasizes artistic collaboration, with a focus on social practices and research. The founders aim to foster relationships between the community and professional artists, in the form of workshops, lectures, talks, exhibitions, publications and an artist-in-residence. Recent collaborations with Treignac Project in Treignac, France, Unit Pitt in Vancouver, Canada, and halka sanat projesi in Istanbul, Turkey.

Sara French

Sara French

  • Sunday October 21, 12:30pm
  • Zine Zone, Exhibition Commons

Can’t B 🌎 (grounded)

Have you ever skipped with a snake? Sara French presents a scripted performance with her custom skip ropes. See them spin, slap, and slither, until they snap.

Sara French lives in Montreal. There she maintains her studio practice as bookmaker, performance artist and painter. A recent breakup turned her on to skipping rope.

Keynote: Andrea Fraser

Andrea Fraser

  • Sunday October 21, 1:00pm
  • Reliance Theatre

Two years later, the ramifications of the 2016 US election are still being felt. It was the most expensive election in US history, with over $6.4 billion raised for presidential and congressional races combined. More than half of this money came from just a few hundred people—many of whom also support cultural institutions and serve on their boards.

In her book, 2016Museums, Money, and Politics, Los Angeles–based artist Andrea Fraser examines the intersection of electoral politics and private-nonprofit art institutions in the United States at a pivotal historical moment.

Fraser’s keynote lecture for the VABF introduces her research for 2016, presenting a powerful argument that supporting the arts must involve more than giving donations to museums; it must also include defending the values, social structures, and political institutions of an open, tolerant, just, and equitable society.

Organized like a telephone book, this 900-page artists’ book is at once institutional critique and reference work—documenting the reported political contributions made by trustees of more than 125 art museums. Contribution data is laid out alphabetically by name of donor. With this and other data, the book offers a material representation of scale of the interface between cultural philanthropy and campaign finance in America. It also provides an unparalleled resource for exploring the politics of the US museum world.

 

Co-presented by Fillip and the Libby Leshgold Gallery. Reception and book launch to follow at READ Books.

Andrea Fraser is an artist and professor of art at the University of California Los Angeles. 2016 in Museums, Money, and Politics is co-published by Westreich Wagner Publications, Wattis Institute of Contemporary Art, and MIT Press.

Contrast Collective

Contrast Collective

  • Sunday October 21, 2:30pm
  • Zine Zone, Exhibition Commons

A live reading with select members of Contrast Collective, a WOC-run, independent print publication and creative collective that aims to facilitate opportunity for marginalized artists within the community.

Reproduction is Not a Metaphor

Kandis Williams

  • Sunday October 21, 3:00pm
  • Artists' Book Room, Library

Drawing from scholar Mary Louise Pratt’s writings on “contact zones”—defined as “social spaces where cultures meet, clash, and grapple with each other, often in contexts of highly asymmetrical relations of power”—artist Kandis Williams will lead a discussion addressing visual and literary representations of otherness. The talk will focus on identity aesthetics that mystify, naturalize, and reify the exploitation, hypersexualization, and racialization of (on, into, and out of) contemporary subjects. Touching on texts spanning legal, anthropological, and academic contexts, Williams will address the foundational underpinnings of what author Aimee Carrillo Rowe describes as the “temporal dis-affiliations, [that] circulate as common sense as a mechanism for whites to disavow their relationship to white supremacy and by extension, free themselves from [political] obligation.”

The talk will cite incest, interraciality, sex-apps, cinema, and performance art as specific forms of late capitalist self-inscription that thrive on the narcissistic commodification of self-blurring lines between exploitation, social control, and self-organization, producing political and philosophical inertia around reparative justice movements.

Presented in partnership with Fillip

Kandis Williams is a Los Angeles and Berlin–based artist. Her recent exhibitions include solo shows at 215 Madison Street, New York; Works on Paper, Vienna; Night Gallery, Los Angeles; SADE, Los Angeles; and St. Charles Projects, Baltimore; and a performance and workshop at Human Resources, Los Angeles. Williams has an active curatorial and writing practice, and runs Cassandra Press with artist Taylor Doran.

Deniz Beşer

Deniz Beşer

  • Sunday October 21, 3:30pm
  • Zine Zone, Exhibition Commons

Beşer will present deep insight into Turkey’s past and present fanzine scene though first-hand experience and a collaborative zine called ”Heyt be! Fanzin”.

Deniz Beşer is an Istanbul and Vienna based visual artist, art coordinator and zinester who graduated from Mimar Sinan Fine Arts University, Ceramic and Glass Design Department (Istanbul, Turkey) and Universidad de Sevilla, Painting Department (Seville, Spain). Beşer is one of the founders of the zine collective ”Heyt be! Fanzin”, ”Nase Zine” and pyshchedelic-punk band ”Zoomk-Ru-Tu”. He is also the Coordinator of ”Fanzineist – Zine Fest of Istanbul” and ”Open Studio Days Istanbul”.

 

The Halifax Conference

Craig Leonard

  • Sunday October 21, 4:00pm
  • Artists' Book Room, Library

In conjunction with the release of his new book The Halifax Conference (New Documents, 2018), artist Craig Leonard will present archival material from the 1970 conference organized by Seth Siegelaub at the Nova Scotia College of Art and Design. The conference was conceived as a means of bringing about a meeting of artists representing diverse kinds of art from different parts of the world, in as general a situation as possible. Infamously, the conference was held in the college’s boardroom, while students and other interested parties watched the proceedings on a video monitor in a separate space. The result was a conversation that devolved—technologically and ideologically—into quasi-tragicomic farce.

Attendees at the conference included Carl Andre, Joseph Beuys, Ronald Bladen, Daniel Buren, John Chamberlain, Jan Dibbets, Al Held, Robert Irwin, Mario Merz, Robert Morris, Robert Murray, The N.E. Thing Company (Iain and Ingrid Baxter), Richard Serra, Richard Smith, Robert Smithson, Michael Snow, and Lawrence Weiner.

Presented in partnership with New Documents

Craig Leonard is a Halifax-based artist, teacher, and activist. His recent exhibitions include those at Double Happiness Projects, Toronto, and Central Art Garage, Ottawa. His work was also featured in the group show Oh Canada at the Esker Foundation, Calgary. He has taught at NSCAD University since 2006 and has remained deeply involved in various artist-run centre over the last two decades including the Khyber, Halifax; FADO, Toronto; and Modern Fuel, Kingston.

How To Do The Flowers

Ruth van Beek

  • Sunday October 21, 5:00pm
  • Artists' Book Room, Library

Amsterdam-based Artist Ruth van Beek presents material from her recent book How To Do The Flowers (Art Paper Editions, 2018). In this artist’s book, van Beek draws from growing archive of found photographic source material taken from vintage manuals–book meant as tools assist everyday occupations. Hands demonstrate how something is supposed to be done. Hands dig in the earth, make dolls, arrange flowers, cook. Through van Beek’s reconfigurations, passive human hands animate, objects become characters, and abstract shapes come to life.

Presented in partnership with New Documents

Ruth van Beek is a Dutch artist and bookmaker based in Koog aan de Zaan. Her work has been presented in several solo and group exhibitions in Amsterdam, Berlin, New York, and San Francisco, and published online and in print in Capricious, Foam Magazine, Vanity Fair, Rodeo, It’s Nice That, and the British Journal of Photography. She recently completed a collaboration with the Italian fashion label Marni. Her book The Cast was published by New Documents in 2017. In 2018, her work The Play was installed at Sapperton Park in New Westminster as part of the Capture Photography Festival.

 

Projects

Additional project programming taking place in various locations throughout the Emily Carr University Exhibition Commons and Library.

How to Shoplift Books

David Horvitz

  • Friday October 19 to Sunday October 21

How To Shoplift Books is a guide on how to steal books in both practical and imaginative ways produced by Los Angeles–based artist David Horvitz. Horvitz’s work was originally published by Automatic Books in 2012 and later re-released as a bootleg edition by Publication Studio in 2014.

The audio version installed at the VABF is read by Vancouver-based designer and musician Courtenay Webber.

David Horvitz is an American artist who uses art books, photography, performance art, and mail art as mediums for his work. He is known for his work in the virtual sphere. A graduate from Bard College, Horvitz has exhibited at SF Camerawork, the Museum of Modern Art, the New Museum, Tate Modern, and Art Metropole. His published work includes: Xiu Xiu: The Polaroid Project (2007), Everything that can happen in a day (2010), and Sad, Depressed, People (2012).

Film Screening: How to Make a Book with Steidl

Gerhard Steidl

  • Saturday October 20, 7:00pm
  • Reliance Theatre

Free Screening 2010
(88 Min, DCP)

For 40 years, Gerhard Steidl has combined the roles of printer and publisher, personally supervised the production of some of the most significant books on fashion, art, and photography.

Steidl’s independent empire is founded on several sources of income—a significant portion of his publishing efforts are dedicated to Karl Lagerfeld and Chanel (printing everything for the designers, from admission tickets to catalogues). The press also prints material for the German Metal Workers’ Union and, for many years, each new book by Nobel laureate Günter Grass.

These commercial projects help fund Steidl Verlag’s photo books. How to Make a Book with Steidl observes Gerhard Steidl as he collaborates on books with the photographers Joel Sternfeld, Robert Frank, Ed Ruscha, Jeff Wall and Robert Adams at their studios and in Göttingen, Germany on press, providing an insightful look at a dynamic, entrepreneurial model dedicated to the craft of bookmaking.

Directed by Jörg Adolph and Gereon Wetzel.

Presented in collaboration with Fillip’s ongoing “Means of Production” series.

Lèche-VITRINE

Stéphane Bernard

  • Friday October 19 to Sunday October 21
  • Library, 1st Floor, Main entrance

The VABF Library & Archive has been a recurring hub at the VABF, giving publishers who can’t attend the opportunity to donate two copies of any book for display. This year, local artists have been invited to donate copies of their publications in order to increase the presence of the Vancouver scene within the collection and original art works will be exhibited alongside these new additions.

Invited artists include: Tim Barnard, Marc Bell, Cathy Busby, Ben Duncan, Hiller Goodspeed, Phaedra Harder & Stephanie McDonell, Nathan Jones, Garry Neill Kennedy, Donato Mancini, Hei Lam Ng, Cole Pauls, Sylvie Ringer, and Dan Starling.

Stéphane Bernard is a painter and educator who is currently exploring the archival process as an artistic medium. This practice takes the form of bookworks, critical writing, print-based projects, performance and curation. He recently finished a Post Baccalaureate Diploma at SFU in 2015 after graduating with a BFA from Laval University (2012), in Quebec City.

Image Credit: Dan Starling, ‘On the Production of Concrete Poetry Whist Typesetting (after Heinrich von Kleist)’, 2018, letterpress prints

A saturated space: a mumbling

Nicole Killian

  • Friday October 19 to Sunday October 21
  • RBC Media Room, Exhibition Commons

Photo as residue
Smell as residue
Pixel as residue
Publication as evidence

Textual desire exists where pleasure is absent. A space of devotional reading, a considered object. A gushing. Folders boulders. Piles and piles.

Presented in partnership with Arts Assembly

Nicole Killian’s work uses graphic design, publishing, video, objects and installation to investigate how the structures of the internet, mobile messaging, and shared online platforms affect contemporary interaction and shape cultural identity from a queer perspective.

Nicole has exhibited at Sediment in Richmond, CAVE in Detroit, Arcadia Missa in London, Present Works in Milwaukee, Little Berlin in Philadelphia, Embassy in Los Angeles, Sadie Halie Projects in Brooklyn, Nomade Gallery in Hangzhou, and Dreamlands: Immersive Cinema and Art at the Whitney Museum of American Art for Lorna Mills’ Ways of Something. Her writing has been published by WOW HUH, The Enemy, Carets + Sticks (now Contemporary Art Review LA), The Journal of Feminist Scholarship, The Theo Westenberger Foundation, and in the third edition of Terry Barrett’s Criticizing Art. A current essay, “The Emotional Potential of Girls Presented on the Internet as Object” will be included by Exempt Works (formerly Penny-ante Editions) in Modern Behaviours. She has spoken at the Royal College of Art in London, Yale School of Art, Kunsthall Stavanger, Maryland Institute College of Art and the Cranbrook Academy of Art. She previously was a visiting artist at the Minneapolis College of Art and Design from 2011–2013.

 

A Word of Encouragement

Booooooom

  • Friday October 19 to Sunday October 21
  • Exhibition Commons

Booooooom presents A Word of Encouragement, an interactive project and installation. Visit the Booooooom website and request free encouragement. Attendees of the VABF will write you an encouraging message. Postcards will be on display and then mailed to those who need a little encouragement 😉

 

Booooooom originally launched in 2008 and quickly became one of the largest art blogs on the Internet. In the years since, Booooooom has helped launch the careers of hundreds of young emerging artists and photographers.

The Infinite Library

Daniel Gustav Cramer and Haris Epaminonda

  • Friday October 19 to Sunday October 21
  • Library Mezzanine

Begun in 2007, The Infinite Library is an ongoing project by Epaminonda and Cramer inspired by the writings of Jorge Luis Borges. The work is composed of an expanding archive of books made through the recombination of pages from one or more found publications. Each book is dismantled, modified, and reorganized. Pictures and pages—momentarily out of order—are brought together to shape yet another whole. The concept for each new volume develops gradually, starting from the content of the original book and the associations that unfold in the process of making.

Haris Epaminonda and Daniel Gustav Cramer are Berlin-based artists who work and exhibit both individually and collaboratively. In their collaborations, they act as curators, creating a narrative space through a loose associations between objects and images.

Laugh Laugh Cry

Number 3 Gallery Presents MOPE

  • Friday October 19 to Sunday October 21
  • Exhibition Commons

Number 3 Gallery presents Laugh Laugh Cry, an exhibition of works by interdisciplinary art collective, MOPE. MOPE (Leah McInnis, Kai Choufour and Danielle Roberts) considers the satirical and the sublime as they take us on a journey, a pilgrimage, if you will, to what might be the Nevada desert on their quest to reach the X Games where they will premier their latest invention: the Grazer. Through robot didactics and collaborative painting, this exhibition explores hyper narratives and dissects plot lines all thematically linked by the quest for ascension. A forthcoming publication will accompany Laugh Laugh Cry at the Vancouver Art Book Fair.

The project was conceived and designed in partnership with Logan Mohr and Pongsakorn Yananissorn on unceded traditional and ancestral indigenous Coast Salish territory.

MOPE is a collective of three visual artists that originated in Vancouver in 2013. Their exhibitions are driven by pseudo-utopian narratives that they create, edit, and return to over time. Previous projects include Vortex to Eden, in which their extensive research of conspiracy theories culminated in an installation of collaborative abstract paintings and a fake currency (the fifty fifty arts collective, Victoria, 2018). Actual Losers examined identity and influence, combining narrative painting, video and Chindōgu inspired sculpture (Dynamo Arts Association, Vancouver, 2018). Most recently, they are studying the effect of distance on collaborative storytelling as they negotiate a shared practice while inhabiting different spaces (physically and psychically). Members include Kai Choufour (Victoria, BC), Leah McInnis (Victoria, BC) and Danielle Roberts (Hamilton, ON).

#3 Gallery is a mobile curatorial space initiating collaborative projects with contemporary artists and spaces. As a satirical response to the lack of feasible real-estate spaces in Vancouver’s economic landscape, the portable scale of #3 allows for exhibitions to adapt and exist within a variety of contexts.

#3 Gallery is curated by practicing artists Julie D. Mills and Julia Lamare.

On Some Faraway Beach

Alicia Nauta and Eunice Luk

  • Friday October 19 to Sunday October 21
  • Exhibition Commons

The artists present a room for slowing down, with installations including wallpaper, ceramics, and ephemera. The room also features a series of small interactions and performances to be experienced throughout the duration of VABF.

Presented in partnership with Zine Club

Alicia Nauta and Eunice Luk have been creating works together since 2013, collaborating on screen prints, book works, installations and exhibitions.

25.47m2

Alex Grünenfelder

  • Friday October 19 to Sunday October 21
  • Exhibition Commons

25.47m2 is a book and installation explores the relationship between printed matter and spatial environments. Taking inspiration from Jorge Luis Borges’s short story “On Exactitude in Science” in which Borges imagines an enormous map equal in size to the empire it represents, 25.47m2 contains the floor plan of a common 274 square-foot Seoul apartment unit reproduced at life size and tiled over 312 recto pages. The book’s 312 verso pages show a 1:1 scale photograph of the entire contents of the apartment.

25.47m2 is a book and installation that presents the architectural document as a physical space commensurate with the serial architectural environment it purports to represent. Days are numbered: 29584 leaves distributed to the air.

BOOKLIT

Natasha Lands

  • Friday October 19 to Sunday October 21
  • Exhibition Commons

An open format trade show for everyone and anyone! A zine making station! Make something on the spot! Paper, pencils, glue, staples, photocopier and radical zine publishers on hand to help you create some magic!

Grey Areas

Aaron Moran

  • Friday October 19 to Sunday October 21
  • Exhibition Commons

GREY AREAS presents work produced during the exploration of abandoned suburban spaces in the Fraser Valley. The project is composed of photo-documented interventions made using objects found in-situ, alongside sculptures made in studio from materials excavated from these spaces. The term ‘grey area’ simultaneously refers to the uncertainty surrounding the present and future state of the spaces, as well as the line between trespassing versus exploring public environments. The work featured is also published in book form as GREY AREAS (2018) by POOR QUALITY.

Aaron Moran is an artist based in Chilliwack, B.C. He received his BFA from Emily Carr University and MFA from the University of Windsor. He has exhibited in Canada and abroad, and received grants from SSHRC, and the BC Arts Council. He operates the publishing imprint POOR QUALITY.

The Garden Pt 2: Reading Room

Moniker Press and Zine Club

  • Friday October 19 to Sunday October 21
  • Zine Zone, Exhibition Commons

The Garden pt 2. is a modular reading room installation by Moniker Press. Soft objects reconstructed from salvaged materials will host a collection of Vancouver based artists books, multi-media, zines and publications curated by Lisa Curry from the VABF Library & Archive. Attendees of the fair are invited to: Sit. Read. Stay awhile.

This iteration of The Garden will be located in the Zine Zone, Exhibition Commons, created in collaboration with the Vancouver Art Book Fair and Zine Club. The first iteration of The Garden was created in 2015 in collaboration with artist, Brandon Cotter.

Exposed

Steven Audia

  • Friday October 19 to Sunday October 21
  • Exhibition Commons

Overt sexuality, kinks, fetishes and graphic imagery have become mainstream. Eroticism and pornography are no longer restricted to intimate situations and a cleared browser history. It’s self-produced, sent and received freely with other people’s pleasure in mind. It’s put online for self-gratification, ego, masturbation—injected and augmented for instant visual impact. It’s cheap, it’s expensive, it’s free, it’s restrictive, it’s pleasurable, it’s painful, it’s intimate and it’s anonymous. It’s for you and it’s for me. Where is the equilibrium between empowered self-sexual-expression and the critical, thirsty, oppressive gaze of the public? Does wrapping up suggestive imagery of a barely clothed woman under the guise of “art” make it more socially acceptable, or is Audia furthering the exploitative, demeaning male gaze they have always been subjected to? As a gay man making images of women, Audia can detach himself from the subject matter and explore sexuality in an objective way, adjusting his mental and physical viewpoint to change the way the image is perceived, from degrading to empowering. Audia hopes to reappropriate a visual language while still exploring the tropes associated with this kind of sexualized imagery.

I am an interdisciplinary artist, designer and curator currently based out of Vancouver. Taking pictures—the process of shooting with film, and then having to hand it over to another individual for printing—has always given me a sense of security and solidity in a world I often feel disassociated and estranged from. Never satisfied, I began experimenting and pushing the boundaries of film as a medium early on to better capture and convey the complex interpersonal relationships being formed around me, along with my increasingly kaleidoscopic mental state. Although I’ve moved away from my roots as a 35 mm purist, these early themes still find a way to root themselves into the work I do, albeit often now in more sobering and subtle ways. From still images grew an interest in moving, and from there a vested interest in environments and objects both real and fictionalized. After that, shapes, colour and form. My educational background has brought me into all these areas with foundations in fine arts and photography and diplomas in graphic and interior design. The work I produce is often aesthetically intersectional; video becomes part of a photograph, fictional interiors or dated objects become the subject, abstraction and pattern is found or created within reality. Lighting, backdrops and shadow become more of a graphic design choice than a photographic consideration. Imperfections and realities break through the surface value of fantasies and sexuality; I always want to expose the truth behind faces, facades and flesh.

ABW

Art Book Week is a parallel series of events hosted in spaces across Vancouver by a variety of artists, curators, collectives and institutions who are actively creating and presenting work in this medium.

Friday

Doubt It: Collected Works By Graeme Zirk

  • Friday October 19 to Thursday October 25, 10–4pm
  • Slice of Life Gallery (1636 Venables Street)

Having spent the better half of a decade working as a designer and art director, “Doubt It” is a resolution of the ideas and drawings accumulated in notebook margins over the past 4 years. Works featured in the show are simply real world versions of the half-cooked things that cropped up in the back of the mind during boardroom meetings, waiting for red-eye flights, train rides in new country sides, self indulgent Instagram posts and late night drawing binges one finds themselves in before knowing anyone in a new city.

The Contrast Café

Contrast Collective

  • Friday October 19 to Sunday October 21, 12–5pm
  • Bestie (105 East Pender Street)

Located in the heart of Chinatown, Bestie will be hosting Contrast Collective for a three day pop up. From October 19th to the 21st, the sausage hub will be transformed into a cozy bookstore for folks to lounge, read, pick up zines and enjoy coffee. The exhibition will feature hot beverages, hot sausages and hot zines created by members of the Contrast Collective. The exhibition will also feature a live DJ set by Softieshan. Contrast Collective is a WOC-ran independent print publication and creative collective that aims to facilitate opportunity for marginalized artists within the community.

Robert Kleyn, P10 Book Launch

  • Friday October 19, 6:30pm
  • Contemporary Art Gallery (555 Nelson Street)

Join the Contemporary Art Gallery for an in-conversation event and signing to celebrate the launch of Page 10, a new artist book by Vancouver artist Robert Kleyn published with Gevaert Editions, Brussels. Influenced by early 1970’s Conceptualism, Page 10 is a meditation on the experience of reading, and continues Kleyn’s longstanding concern with seriality, self-referentiality and authorship. As part of the event, Kleyn will perform an homage to Italian Arte Povera artist Emilio Prini.

Sip + Shop: READING RAINBOW Edition

  • Friday October 19, 6–10pm
  • (High Five Studio) 245-237 Keefer Street

High Five Studio is an artist studio based in Chinatown, made up of creatives Rachel Rivera, Nadine Nevitt, Claire Ouchi and Brendan Kane. This edition of our HFS Sip + Shop: READING RAINBOW will highlight a curation of photography, zine, print and art. We open up our studio to the community to share what local artists and designers have created and give them a space to showcase and sell their work. A little about us, our brands at High Five include (via Insta) – @hellohighfivestudio / @hucklifestyle / @nadine.nevitt.and.co / @wkndrsforlife / @hairypopularity

CRAB,STICK,ROCK,LOSS: Exhibition and Book Launch

Sylvie Ringer

  • Friday October 19, 7-11pm
  • James Black Gallery (144 E 6th Avenue)

The drawings and paintings of the project and publication CRAB, STICK, ROCK, LOSS can be seen as associative narrations, based on the artist’s yearlong stay on Malcolm Island, BC. This work explores the notion of landscape as a state of mind and references places of cultural, mystical and personal significance. Sylvie Ringer is an artist based in Hamburg, Germany and currently lives and works in Vancouver. She focuses on the notion of place, landscape and narration within a practice that includes drawing, print media and painting. Her current work investigates the power of sites with historical or mystical significance (“Kraftorte”) and navigates the threshold between waking and dreaming, darkness and light.

Stale Buns

FIELD Contemporary/Moniker Press

  • Friday October 19, 7–10pm
  • FIELD Contemporary (17 West Broadway)

Stale Buns brings together a group of publishers, artists and collectives to showcase a variety of artist’s books, video, animation and editions. Hot dogs and refreshments will be available as partner pieces to the book ephemera. Including: Ali Bosley, Flavourcel, Mark DeLong + Peanuts Gallery, Scott Kemp + Emma Metcalfe-Hurst, Scott Lougheed + Mel Thibodeau, Tom Richardson, Julia Dahee Hong, Eunice Luk, Christian Vistan and more. The event runs alongside Dylan Townley-Smith’s exhibition, Situ Comoedia. The gallery will also be open from 2pm to 8pm on Saturday, October 20 and Sunday, October 21.

Realms II

Official Vancouver Art Book Fair Opening Party

  • Friday, October 19, 7pm to late
  • Dynamo Arts Association Suite 103 - 30 East 6th Ave

28 artists curated by Jon Vaughn

Realms II is a project that brings together 100 artists across the pages of a book and a exhibition of works. For Dynamo Arts Association Vaughn has selected the works of 28 artists focusing on painting, collage, drawing, fibre and print-based work. The exhibition will feature new pieces made especially for this edition by artists-in-attendance from Taipei, Portland and Vancouver who will also be tabling at the Vancouver Art Book Fair.

The reception for Realms II, also an official VABF after party on Friday night will feature live electronic sounds from Portland’s Phull Collums (aka Sean Christensen, also featured in the Realms II book and exhibition), as well as the pulsating and hypnotic music of Vancouver’s Sara Gold. Opening the reception will be DJ sets by Quiet Ciy curator Scant Intone (Constantine Katsiris) and Chicago-based comic artist/publisher Ben Marcus. Closing out the night, a slew DJs will take to the decks, some of the finest rhythm junkies of Vancouver’s electronic underground; Regularfantasy, Lisa Frank, Aptorian with the Regina-based curator himself as VC Vibes.

Saturday

Letterpress and Lager

International Centre for Arts and Technology/Little Tokyo Letterpress

  • Saturday October 20, 10am-3pm
  • Sun Wah Centre (4th Floor FLEX Space, 268 Keefer Street)

A fun open studio event with Little Tokyo Letterpress, a new studio based in ICOAAT (The International Centre of Arts and Technology) in Chinatown. Stop by and say hello. We’ll be printing on paper coasters with non-toxic environmentally friendly inks! Little Tokyo Letterpress prints small poetry broadsheets, books, art prints and more on a couple of little platen presses. ICOAAT is a literary BIPOC LGTBQ2SI makerspace focused on the intersection of art, text and technology.

Make Your Own Art Book

  • Saturday October 20 and Sunday October 21, 11am-4pm
  • Cartems Donuterie (2190 Main Street)

Art Books aren’t just for adults! Stop by Cartems Donuts with your little ones to draw, collage and colour in an Art Book of your very own. Hosted by one of our creative staff members who will help through the bookmaking process.  Premade books, paper, drawing materials and more will be supplied. All you have to bring are the ideas! Intended for kids age 4-12, but all are welcome.

Corner Store Discussion Session #3: Community & Solidarity

Access Gallery/Lexi Owen

  • Saturday October 20, 1-3:30pm
  • PLOT @ Access Gallery (222 East Georgia Street)

Corner Store is a project by Lexie Owen wherein Access Gallery’s PLOT space is transformed through an installation referential of the McGill Grocery near Burrardview Park in Vancouver, BC—a space which not only provides food but also serves as a community hub. The project provides an anchor point for discussions about social practice, contemporary art and community engagement, as well as urgent and specific local issues of food security, gentrification and diasporic identity. This third discussion in the series is organized around notions of Community and Solidarity, considering the role of arts institutions towards supporting community activity. Invited speakers and moderators will be announced on Access Gallery’s website and social media streams.

Doubt It: Collected Works By Graeme Zirk

  • Friday October 19 to Thursday October 25, 10–4pm
  • Slice of Life Gallery (1636 Venables Street)

Having spent the better half of a decade working as a designer and art director, “Doubt It” is a resolution of the ideas and drawings accumulated in notebook margins over the past 4 years. Works featured in the show are simply real world versions of the half-cooked things that cropped up in the back of the mind during boardroom meetings, waiting for red-eye flights, train rides in new country sides, self indulgent Instagram posts and late night drawing binges one finds themselves in before knowing anyone in a new city.

Responses Book Launch

Wil Aballe Art Projects

  • Saturday October 20, 2:00pm
  • WAAP (1129 East Hastings Street)

During VABF, WAAP will launch its new book, Responses, a book of texts written in response to exhibitions at the gallery. Writers include Alex Quicho, Jaclyn Bruneau, Elliat Albrecht, Michael Prokopow, Nora O Murchu, Areum Kim, Alex Bowron, Carla Benzan, Sunshine Frere, Yokna Patofa, Jon Davies, Marina Roy, Kristin Trethewey, Felicia E. Gail and Lauren Fournier. The book has been designed by Erica Wilk of Moniker Press and has a very limited print run. In conjunction to the book launch, a grouping of collected artist books and editions, by Michael Morris, Lee Lozano, Lucy Lippard, J. Meejin Yoon, Adam Bloomberg and Oliver Chanarin, Image Bank, Zeesy Powers, Gareth Long and Derek Sullivan will be on display to peruse.

Book Launch & Artist Signing: Information Office presents Black Book by Hyung-Min Yoon

Information Office

  • Saturday October 20, 3-5pm
  • READ Books, ECUAD (520 East 1st Avenue)

Information Office is pleased to announce its forthcoming publication Black Book by artist Hyung-Min Yoon. The artist’s book joins two distinct threads of disparate cultures and histories — Confucian virtues and black humour — inquiring into contemporary ideologies such as patriarchy and technological determinism. Yoon will be signing copies from 3-5pm, with refreshments available inside the store. Hyung-Min Yoon is a visual artist working between Vancouver, Canada and Seoul, Korea. Her research and text-based art practice draws inspiration from literature and early art history. Through installation, photography, video and print, her gestures reveal the ambiguities and contradictions that lay hidden in processes of translation and the construction of meaning. In recent years, her investigations have included the role that technologies have played in the spread of ideologies through time.

Sip + Shop: READING RAINBOW Edition

  • Saturday October 20, 3-9pm
  • High Five Studio (245-237 Keefer Street)

High Five Studio is an artist studio based in Chinatown, made up of creatives Rachel Rivera, Nadine Nevitt, Claire Ouchi and Brendan Kane. This edition of our HFS Sip + Shop: READING RAINBOW will highlight a curation of photography, zine, print and art. We open up our studio to the community to share what local artists and designers have created and give them a space to showcase and sell their work. A little about us, our brands at High Five include (via Insta) [email protected] / @hucklifestyle / @nadine.nevitt.and.co / @wkndrsforlife / @hairypopularity

Organizing Meeting of the Art Book Workers World Industrial Union (ABWWIU)

UNIT/PITT

  • Saturday October 20, 7:30-11pm
  • 8EAST (8 East Pender Street)

Join us for food, music and a discussion of the exploitation, class discrimination and other forms of oppression built in to the art system. Admission is free with the purchase of a membership, which will also include a copy of the ABWWIU Handbook. Doors open at 7:30PM, welcome at 8PM, remarks at 8:30PM, followed by music and dancing.

Open Studio Speakeasy

  • Saturday, October 20, 8-10pm
  • Brick Press (247 Main Street)

Brick Press is pleased to host an open studio speakeasy at their 247 Main Street storefront location during this year’s fair. Having just opened their studio to the public (on October 11th), which also includes a small bookstore, this event will give guests an opportunity to view Brick Press’s offset production space, enjoy drinks and books!

Sunday

Intro to Letterpress

WePress

  • Tuesday October 14, 2-5pm
  • WePress (9 West Hastings Street)

Join us at WePress to learn some of the basics of typesetting, inking and operating our letterpress. Attendees will collaborate to create a poster and each participant will print their own copy to take with them. Space is limited (maximum 10 participants) so please register in advance on Eventbrite (https://www.eventbrite.ca/e/intro-to-letterpress-oct-14-tickets-49798730343), email [email protected] or call 604-670-3424. All materials and equipment provided. WePress is a community artspace in Vancouver’s Downtown Eastside on the occupied territories of the Musqueam, Squamish and Tsleil-Waututh Nations. We offer historic and contemporary methods of print- and art-making to those marginalized by systems of class, sexuality, gender, race, culture, disability, mental health, addictions and colonization to empower themselves and build community capacity and resilience through art-making.

The Contrast Café

Contrast Collective

  • Friday October 19 to Sunday October 21, 12–5pm
  • Bestie (105 East Pender Street)

Located in the heart of Chinatown, Bestie will be hosting Contrast Collective for a three day pop up. From October 19th to the 21st, the sausage hub will be transformed into a cozy bookstore for folks to lounge, read, pick up zines and enjoy coffee. The exhibition will feature hot beverages, hot sausages and hot zines created by members of the Contrast Collective. The exhibition will also feature a live DJ set by Softieshan. Contrast Collective is a WOC-ran independent print publication and creative collective that aims to facilitate opportunity for marginalized artists within the community.

Doubt It: Collected Works By Graeme Zirk

  • Friday October 19 to Thursday October 25, 10–4pm
  • Slice of Life Gallery (1636 Venables Street)

Having spent the better half of a decade working as a designer and art director, “Doubt It” is a resolution of the ideas and drawings accumulated in notebook margins over the past 4 years. Works featured in the show are simply real world versions of the half-cooked things that cropped up in the back of the mind during boardroom meetings, waiting for red-eye flights, train rides in new country sides, self indulgent Instagram posts and late night drawing binges one finds themselves in before knowing anyone in a new city.

Nicole Killian | Meat and Marginalia // Orchestra 2: a mobile lecture and dance party

Nicole Killian

  • Sunday October 21, 7pm-late
  • Duplex (4257 Fraser Street)

Arts Assembly has invited Nicole Killian to present their second iteration of Orchestra. On no fixed schuedule, we will be hosting lectures followed by a dance party DJ’ed by the speaker. The subjects of collectivity, revolt, euphoria, music, pleasure, bliss, music, dance and bodies will be engaged first with the mind, and then with movement. Nicole Killian’s work uses graphic design, publishing, video, objects and installation to investigate how the structures of the internet, mobile messaging and shared online platforms affect contemporary interaction and shape cultural identity from a queer perspective. Nicole appreciates a good karaoke performance and is co-creator of annual publication ISSUES with Sarah Faith Gottesdiener and recently launched her publishing initiative, Nico Fontana. She is currently co-director of the Design, Visual Communications MFA and Assistant Professor in the Department of Graphic Design at Virginia Commonwealth University.

Monday

Doubt It: Collected Works By Graeme Zirk

  • Friday October 19 to Thursday October 25, 10–4pm
  • Slice of Life Gallery (1636 Venables Street)

Having spent the better half of a decade working as a designer and art director, “Doubt It” is a resolution of the ideas and drawings accumulated in notebook margins over the past 4 years. Works featured in the show are simply real world versions of the half-cooked things that cropped up in the back of the mind during boardroom meetings, waiting for red-eye flights, train rides in new country sides, self indulgent Instagram posts and late night drawing binges one finds themselves in before knowing anyone in a new city.

Archive of Inspiration: an exhibition of collected artist books and editions

Wil Aballe Art Projects

  • Monday October 22 to Tuesday October 24, 12-5pm
  • 1129 East Hastings Street

WAAP is exhibiting a group of collected artist books and editions by Michael Morris, Lee Lozano, Lucy Lippard, J. Meejin Yoon, Adam Bloomberg and Oliver Chanarin, Image Bank, Zeesy Powers, Gareth Long and Derek Sullivan. Presented in conjunction with the launch of Responses, a book of texts written in response to exhibitions at the gallery.

Patrick Wong: Sacred Trail

Hello World Ceramics Gallery

  • Saturday October 20 to Thursday October 25
  • 604 East Hastings

Third in a series of collaborative graphic memoirs, Wong teams up with Darryle Schweder of the Shamattawa First Nations to produce an illustrated Riso booklet and decorated ceramic objects led by Linda Lewis. The brief graphic narrative commemorates Schweder’s journey from the remote, northern reservation of Shamattawa to Manitoba’s capitol city where the two met in the 1990s. The complete narrative is presented in the Window Gallery facing Hastings Street. Patrick Wong is an illustrator and artist based in Richmond, Canada. He is a graduate of Emily Carr University of Art + Design and has exhibited in Los Angeles, Austin and New York. Patrick has also worked internationally for clients such as the Washington Post, The Sunday Times and the March of Dimes Foundation. His illustrations have been recognized by American Illustration, Society of Illustrators Los Angeles and Creative Quarterly.

 

Hello World Ceramics is the studio of ceramic artist and teacher, Linda Lewis. She curates the Front Window Gallery at Hello World featuring local artists as well as showing her own work. Update hours to: Window Gallery 24/7; Studio is open from approximately 10 am to 4 pm but 778-848-7207 or email [email protected] if you are making a special trip.

Tuesday

Typewriter Writing Stations

  • Tuesday October 23, 12-5pm
  • Regional Assembly of Text (3934 Main Street)

We will have a few typewriters set up for use along with writing prompts and inspiration. Write a poem or start a novel on an old fashioned machine. Flip through some zines from our lowercase reading room for inspiration. If you’ve never used a typewriter before we’d be happy to show you how. Drop-in. No cost. Everyone welcome.

Sutures

Sticks and Stones Tattoo

  • Tuesday October 23, 12-7pm
  • 485 Main Street

Sticks and Stones Tattoo will be pre-releasing a zine on their website + instagram (@sticks.stonestattoo) on October 21, featuring experimental flash and personal art by all of their artists culminating in a flash day on October 23. It will be a pre-booked flash day, meaning that it will not be a first come first served event, and all flash will come from the zine. The public can come by, see the artists work and buy zines on the day of the event, so that the tattooers will function more like live tattooing performance. Participating artists: Ciara Havishya, Liam Blvck, Benjamin Bates, April-Lee Rivera Johnson, Glenn Thorn, Rachel Clark, Russell Alton, Mandy Tsung, and Sylvie Couture.

Adrian Stimson: Naked Napi

  • Tuesday October 23 to Saturday October 27, 12-6 pm
  • SUM Gallery (425-268 Keefer Street)

SUM Gallery, in partnership with Full Circle, presents Naked Napi, a solo exhibition of new works by Adrian Stimson. Napi is a character from traditional stories of the Siksika (Blackfoot) nation. Often referred to as the “Old Man” who came from the sun, Napi and the “Old Woman” are known as quasi-creators in these stories. Through this collection, Naked Napi reimagines the traditional tales of Napi in the present, where the intersections of indigeneity, sexuality and Two-Spirit identities are drawn to the forefront. It is a display of reclamation that challenges the colonial erasure of Indigenous bodies, power and sexual histories.

Doubt It: Collected Works By Graeme Zirk

  • Friday October 19 to Thursday October 25, 10–4pm
  • Slice of Life Gallery (1636 Venables Street)

Having spent the better half of a decade working as a designer and art director, “Doubt It” is a resolution of the ideas and drawings accumulated in notebook margins over the past 4 years. Works featured in the show are simply real world versions of the half-cooked things that cropped up in the back of the mind during boardroom meetings, waiting for red-eye flights, train rides in new country sides, self indulgent Instagram posts and late night drawing binges one finds themselves in before knowing anyone in a new city.

Non-Regular, a book about precarious academic labour at Emily Carr University of Art and Design

Terra Poirier

  • Tuesday October 23, 6pm
  • Aboriginal Gathering Place, 2nd floor, ECUAD (520 East 1st Avenue)

Join us as we launch Non-Regular: Precarious academic labour at Emily Carr University of Art + Design, an artist’s book by Terra Poirier in collaboration with 26 instructors and artists speaking candidly about the conditions of their labour. Published by UNIT/PITT Projects. Artists and instructors will address the question: How does employment precarity affect our art and research practices? With Deneige Nadeau, Kristina Lee Podesva, Terra Poirier and Rita Wong. Moderated by Magnolia Pauker. Presented by UNIT/PITT and the Emily Carr Faculty Association. A Vancouver Art Book Week and Fair Employment Week event.

Reception at 6pm followed by an artist panel

Archive of Inspiration: an exhibition of collected artist books and editions

Wil Aballe Art Projects

  • Monday October 22 to Tuesday October 24, 12-5pm
  • 1129 East Hastings Street

WAAP is exhibiting a group of collected artist books and editions by Michael Morris, Lee Lozano, Lucy Lippard, J. Meejin Yoon, Adam Bloomberg and Oliver Chanarin, Image Bank, Zeesy Powers, Gareth Long and Derek Sullivan. Presented in conjunction with the launch of Responses, a book of texts written in response to exhibitions at the gallery.

Patrick Wong: Sacred Trail

Hello World Ceramics Gallery

  • Saturday October 20 to Thursday October 25
  • 604 East Hastings

Third in a series of collaborative graphic memoirs, Wong teams up with Darryle Schweder of the Shamattawa First Nations to produce an illustrated Riso booklet and decorated ceramic objects led by Linda Lewis. The brief graphic narrative commemorates Schweder’s journey from the remote, northern reservation of Shamattawa to Manitoba’s capitol city where the two met in the 1990s. The complete narrative is presented in the Window Gallery facing Hastings Street. Patrick Wong is an illustrator and artist based in Richmond, Canada. He is a graduate of Emily Carr University of Art + Design and has exhibited in Los Angeles, Austin and New York. Patrick has also worked internationally for clients such as the Washington Post, The Sunday Times and the March of Dimes Foundation. His illustrations have been recognized by American Illustration, Society of Illustrators Los Angeles and Creative Quarterly.

 

Hello World Ceramics is the studio of ceramic artist and teacher, Linda Lewis. She curates the Front Window Gallery at Hello World featuring local artists as well as showing her own work. Update hours to: Window Gallery 24/7; Studio is open from approximately 10 am to 4 pm but 778-848-7207 or email [email protected] if you are making a special trip.

Wednesday

Archive of Inspiration: an exhibition of collected artist books and editions

Wil Aballe Art Projects

  • Monday October 22 to Tuesday October 24, 12-5pm
  • 1129 East Hastings Street

WAAP is exhibiting a group of collected artist books and editions by Michael Morris, Lee Lozano, Lucy Lippard, J. Meejin Yoon, Adam Bloomberg and Oliver Chanarin, Image Bank, Zeesy Powers, Gareth Long and Derek Sullivan. Presented in conjunction with the launch of Responses, a book of texts written in response to exhibitions at the gallery.

Patrick Wong: Sacred Trail

Hello World Ceramics Gallery

  • Saturday October 20 to Thursday October 25
  • 604 East Hastings

Third in a series of collaborative graphic memoirs, Wong teams up with Darryle Schweder of the Shamattawa First Nations to produce an illustrated Riso booklet and decorated ceramic objects led by Linda Lewis. The brief graphic narrative commemorates Schweder’s journey from the remote, northern reservation of Shamattawa to Manitoba’s capitol city where the two met in the 1990s. The complete narrative is presented in the Window Gallery facing Hastings Street. Patrick Wong is an illustrator and artist based in Richmond, Canada. He is a graduate of Emily Carr University of Art + Design and has exhibited in Los Angeles, Austin and New York. Patrick has also worked internationally for clients such as the Washington Post, The Sunday Times and the March of Dimes Foundation. His illustrations have been recognized by American Illustration, Society of Illustrators Los Angeles and Creative Quarterly.

 

Hello World Ceramics is the studio of ceramic artist and teacher, Linda Lewis. She curates the Front Window Gallery at Hello World featuring local artists as well as showing her own work. Update hours to: Window Gallery 24/7; Studio is open from approximately 10 am to 4 pm but 778-848-7207 or email [email protected] if you are making a special trip.

Adrian Stimson: Naked Napi

  • Tuesday October 23 to Saturday October 27, 12-6 pm
  • SUM Gallery (425-268 Keefer Street)

SUM Gallery, in partnership with Full Circle, presents Naked Napi, a solo exhibition of new works by Adrian Stimson. Napi is a character from traditional stories of the Siksika (Blackfoot) nation. Often referred to as the “Old Man” who came from the sun, Napi and the “Old Woman” are known as quasi-creators in these stories. Through this collection, Naked Napi reimagines the traditional tales of Napi in the present, where the intersections of indigeneity, sexuality and Two-Spirit identities are drawn to the forefront. It is a display of reclamation that challenges the colonial erasure of Indigenous bodies, power and sexual histories.

Doubt It: Collected Works By Graeme Zirk

  • Friday October 19 to Thursday October 25, 10–4pm
  • Slice of Life Gallery (1636 Venables Street)

Having spent the better half of a decade working as a designer and art director, “Doubt It” is a resolution of the ideas and drawings accumulated in notebook margins over the past 4 years. Works featured in the show are simply real world versions of the half-cooked things that cropped up in the back of the mind during boardroom meetings, waiting for red-eye flights, train rides in new country sides, self indulgent Instagram posts and late night drawing binges one finds themselves in before knowing anyone in a new city.

Thursday

Patrick Wong: Sacred Trail

Hello World Ceramics Gallery

  • Saturday October 20 to Thursday October 25
  • 604 East Hastings

Third in a series of collaborative graphic memoirs, Wong teams up with Darryle Schweder of the Shamattawa First Nations to produce an illustrated Riso booklet and decorated ceramic objects led by Linda Lewis. The brief graphic narrative commemorates Schweder’s journey from the remote, northern reservation of Shamattawa to Manitoba’s capitol city where the two met in the 1990s. The complete narrative is presented in the Window Gallery facing Hastings Street. Patrick Wong is an illustrator and artist based in Richmond, Canada. He is a graduate of Emily Carr University of Art + Design and has exhibited in Los Angeles, Austin and New York. Patrick has also worked internationally for clients such as the Washington Post, The Sunday Times and the March of Dimes Foundation. His illustrations have been recognized by American Illustration, Society of Illustrators Los Angeles and Creative Quarterly.

 

Hello World Ceramics is the studio of ceramic artist and teacher, Linda Lewis. She curates the Front Window Gallery at Hello World featuring local artists as well as showing her own work. Update hours to: Window Gallery 24/7; Studio is open from approximately 10 am to 4 pm but 778-848-7207 or email [email protected] if you are making a special trip.

Doubt It: Collected Works By Graeme Zirk

  • Friday October 19 to Thursday October 25, 10–4pm
  • Slice of Life Gallery (1636 Venables Street)

Having spent the better half of a decade working as a designer and art director, “Doubt It” is a resolution of the ideas and drawings accumulated in notebook margins over the past 4 years. Works featured in the show are simply real world versions of the half-cooked things that cropped up in the back of the mind during boardroom meetings, waiting for red-eye flights, train rides in new country sides, self indulgent Instagram posts and late night drawing binges one finds themselves in before knowing anyone in a new city.

Adrian Stimson: Naked Napi

  • Tuesday October 23 to Saturday October 27, 12-6 pm
  • SUM Gallery (425-268 Keefer Street)

SUM Gallery, in partnership with Full Circle, presents Naked Napi, a solo exhibition of new works by Adrian Stimson. Napi is a character from traditional stories of the Siksika (Blackfoot) nation. Often referred to as the “Old Man” who came from the sun, Napi and the “Old Woman” are known as quasi-creators in these stories. Through this collection, Naked Napi reimagines the traditional tales of Napi in the present, where the intersections of indigeneity, sexuality and Two-Spirit identities are drawn to the forefront. It is a display of reclamation that challenges the colonial erasure of Indigenous bodies, power and sexual histories.

Indigeneity in Comics

Comix for Community Solidarity presents

  • Thursday, October 25, 6–8pm
  • 221a East Pender Street

As part of Comix for Community Solidarity, 221A invites Cole Pauls to host a two-part reading group and artist talk on Indigeneity in comics at Pollyanna 圖書館 Library.

In this talk, Pauls will discuss Indigenous futurisms and his comic Dakwäkãda Warriors, a language revival series about two Southern Tutchone earth protectors saving the earth from evil pioneers and cyborg sasquatches.

http://polly-anna.ca/activity/cole-pauls-artist-talk8